RAVE FabriCARE: Position Papers

Our brief discussion of various issues related to
fine garments, household textiles and accessories

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Dry cleaning & laundry services: Are you getting what you paid for?

 

Dry cleaning & laundry services: Are you getting what you paid for?

By: Stu Bloom

Every cleaner claims to be a true quality dry cleaner.

Fact is, very few are.

But that doesn’t stop them from claiming that they are. So they’re forced to misrepresent and distort the information they provide about the quality of the product they produce in general, and the processes they employ to produce that product in particular.

Let’s get specific …

Dry Cleaning

 

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that they gently dry clean and hand iron all your fine garments (other than shirt laundry). As a matter of routine.

Baloney!

Bet they don’t.

Truth is you’re paying for garments that have been sorted into “lights” and “darks”, tossed into a dry clean machine with little or no pre-spotting, cleaned in a relatively aggressive, dye-stripping, toxic solvent (perchloroethylene, synthetic petroleum or formaldehyde dibutyl acetal) that’s supplemented with moisture/water, sizing and/or fragrance.

All this before your garments are machine pressed and then “squirted” with steam from a hand iron in an attempt to conceal any evidence of machine pressing.

What’s more, many of your cottons and linens may not have been dry cleaned at all. They’ve probably been washed or wet cleaned, tossed into a dryer, machine pressed and then “squirted” with steam.

Shirt Laundry

 

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that they gently clean and hand iron all your laundered shirts. As a matter of routine.

Hogwash!

Bet they don’t.

Truth is, you’re paying $8 to $10 for a $2 to $3 shirt that’s been boiled, bleached, baked and machine pressed. Then “strategically touched up” by hand (if deemed necessary, if you’re lucky) and creased down the sleeve.

Many cleaners call this machine pressed/touched up/ceased sleeve shirt a “hand finished shirt,” hoping that you’ll never understand the difference between a “hand ironed shirt” ($8 to $10) and a “machine pressed/touched up/ceased sleeve shirt” ($2 to $3).

Fine Bed and Table Linens

 

Their verbal assurances, their promotional materials and their public relations professionals tell you that

they gently clean and perfectly finish all your fine bed and table linens. As a matter of routine. They also tell you that they do all their work in-house.

Poppycock!

Bet they don’t.

Truth is, you’re probably paying for bed and table linens that are subcontracted to some cheap, unknown, local wholesale laundry. Where they’re boiled and bleached before being run through a Mangle ironer (yes, it’s pronounced “mangler”) like bathroom tissue through a Charmin factory.

Summary

 

At RAVE FabriCARE, you won’t find information that sounds vaguely impressive in an attempt to sound good while hiding what’s really going on.

Why?

Because clients can see through the smoke screen. And clients can spot misrepresentations and distortions a mile away.

At RAVE FabriCARE, we tell you exactly what we do, why we do it that way and why we don’t do what ordinary cleaners do. In plain English. And we’ll provide you with accurate information about our processes and craftsmanship — with a degree of specificity that’s unheard of in the dry cleaning industry.

And why do we provide this information?

Because the more you know about our processes and craftsmanship, the better you’ll be able to differentiate between true quality cleaning and ordinary, bang and hang cleaning.

So there you have it. The truth about cleaners who present themselves as true quality cleaners but whose product – minus the fancy packaging – is, for the most part, no better than any average, ordinary cleaner.

Are you getting what you pay for?

 

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Filed Under:

General,Position Paper

Author

Stu Bloom

Stu Bloom is Founder and President of RAVE FabriCARE. RAVE FabriCARE, based in Scottsdale, Arizona, cares for fine garments, household textiles and accessories and serves clients throughout the USA and Canada. Stu is the author of various ebooks on these subjects, all of which are available from www.ravefabricare.com/freestuff. He is an evangelist for true quality cleaning and is a contributor to and editor of True Quality Cleaning, RAVE FabriCARE’s blog. You can find Stu on Twitter, Google+ and LinkedIn.

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